Author Interview: Khushnuma Daruwala

In March of this year, as part of the Femme March Fest Challenge, I read a total of 8 books that included A Charm of Finches and Mudbound. But also read another book that made me laugh a LOT and made me fall in love with it. This book is called 50 Cups of Coffee: The Woes and Throes of Finding Mr. Right.

Author Interview: Suanne Laqueur

I read Suanne Laqueur’s A Charm of Finches in March this year and was blown away with how beautifully she portrayed emotions and reality. This book is the second in the Venery series, but I felt comfortable reading it because it could even pass off as a standalone book. I wrote a review of the book and posted it on my blog (which you can read here), and to Goodreads. And then I forgot all about it.

Introduction Post Revamp – Hello, Hello Again!

There’s nothing better in the world than feeling pumped after reading a good book or watching a good movie. Okay, I agree. Not all books and not all movies are entertaining. But you get the general idea. It is the anticipation that is most exciting.

Sita: Warrior of Mithila – Is Amish Losing Steam?

I have always been vocal about how much I admire Amish’s writing. From the Shiva trilogy to Ram: Scion of Ikshvaku, the first in the Ram Chandra series, I’ve loved everything he’s written. His spin on Hinduism’s favorite Gods without losing the essence was what held my attention in the first place, even though I am not too religious.

Life Is What You Make It – Agree and Disagree

At first glance, it seems like a teen romance – something that gives them the impetus to plod on through the challenging years. But it is not. Sure, the encouragement is there, but not in the way we envisioned it to be. The phrase “appearances are deceptive” quickly jumped to mind as I was halfway through the story.

King Lear – Strenuous To Read But Heartbreaking

The only book I’d read of William Shakespeare was Timon of Athens. As time passed, I thought, maybe I should be reading his more popular works like Romeo and Juliet, and As You Like It. But then my book list kept expanding (and still does) to the point where I did not want to concentrate on one author at all times. There is another reason, but I’ll reveal it as I round off this review.

The Cherry Tree – The Perfect Dose of Warm Nostalgia

The Cherry Tree is the story of a young boy called Rakesh who plants a seed and then watches it grow, amidst many obstacles, into a strong tree that gives shade and life. It is nothing out of the ordinary. But when Rakesh becomes ecstatic that the plant has taken roots, or when he becomes sad that animals have nipped off the leaves, you laugh and cry with him.

Murder in Amaravati – Scintillatingly Thrilling and Captivating!

The reason I keep going back to read Sharath Komarraju’s books is his exceptional description skills. His words have a knack of transporting you into the scene almost immediately. His wonderful insights into the workings of the mind, especially a woman’s, leave me spellbound. At one place, he says, “She wondered if it was the woman inside her that made her worry so. Did she always have to have something to think about, something to fret and brood over?”

The Bestseller She Wrote – Ravi Subramanian

The Bestseller She Wrote is a page-turner, and as a reader, I expected something to jump out at me from every page. I was prepared to stomach it. But it is the mark of a brilliant storyteller to show how even the best of preparations can be brought to their knees by mere words. The redemption brought to me a fierce sense of vindication that I never thought it would.