10 Books Every Woman Must Read

There are millions of books in the world, published day in, day out. It is hard to read every one of them in the limited lifespan that we have. But the pro of having so many books is that you never run out of books to read. There is always that one book that you have to read. It’s right there on your book list and you can’t wait to get your hands on it. Once you’re done with it, another one mysteriously emerges and thus, the cycle goes on and on.

Book Review: All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

When I heard of All the Bright Places and how it was being marketed as something that fans of John Green – especially those of The Fault in Our Stars – will love, I thought I had to read this one. Thinking thus, I bought it almost 2 years ago. And since the movie came out recently, I felt like there was no better time for me to read it than now.

Book Rant: Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani

This book would probably have killed me by giving me high blood pressure. I was so pissed off with each page I turned that it took me all my strength and energy to not throw the book across the room. And I was reading it on the Kindle app on my laptop, so I know that that was a good decision.

Book Review: House of Trelawney by Hannah Rothschild

Just the cover of Hannah Rothschild’s The Improbability of Love brought me to my knees, even though I haven’t read it in the year that I have owned it. Plus, I had heard great things about the book. So of course, when the author’s new book came out, I became excited. And when Bloomsbury India granted me the review request, I literally squealed! Thing is, disappointment doesn’t warn you before it strikes. That’s probably why some are so hard to digest. And this one, House of Trelawney, is one such.

Book Review: On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

I LOVE ANGIE THOMAS! There’s no two ways about it. She got me in The Hate U Give. She got me in On the Come Up. Seriously. HOW DOES SHE DO THAT?!

It’s Time We Stopped Discriminating Our LGBTQ+ Fellows!

The Universe as we know it is a bouquet of multitudinous, constantly revolving, constantly moving objects. In the largest scheme of things, we figure as nothing but mere specks. God, the one Creator of everything that exists, made sure that existence didn’t show bias. Everything, from the brightest star to the dullest meteor is allowed to take its own path. Occasionally, there are explosions from them running in to each other, but who’s complaining? There are after all, certain laws that keep them away from each other most of the time. And that’s just how the Universe works. If God is content with watching the Universe learn on its own, how does one planet’s haughty rebellion even matter?

Book Review: A Ticklish Affair by Sunil Kapoor & Sudhir Kapoor

A Ticklish Affair is a short story collection that promises to explore the underbellies of different professions and life in general while being mindful of the emotions that the people involved go through. It is a collection of 10 short stories, each one attempting to be out of this world.

Déjà Vu.

I don’t believe in divine intervention by a large margin. If that were the case, things would have been very, very different for me by now. But what I do believe is the effect of déjà vu on the human psyche. The feeling that things have happened before – that you’ve been here before and done it all.

Book Review: Time and Chance by V. A. Mohta

'Time and Chance' is the autobiographical account of the late V. A. Mohta, who was born in Akola in a Maheshwari family. He rose from being a mofussil lawyer to becoming a Chief Justice of the Odisha High Court. V. A. Mohta talks about his life from starting off from a business family to being a family of lawyers and judges. He talks about his relationship with his family, friends, and colleagues - all the people who had a lasting impression on him.

Book Review: Lights! Scalpel! Romance! by Jas Kohli

The world is no stranger to medical rom-coms despite us having a rather rigid perspective when it comes to doctors. While over in America, Scrubs was and still is a classic, India had Sanjeevani and Dill Mill Gaye, with the former considered to be more popular. But we hardly have had any books that talked about the light-hearted shenanigans that go on in doctors’ lives.