King Lear – Strenuous To Read But Heartbreaking

The only book I’d read of William Shakespeare was Timon of Athens. As time passed, I thought, maybe I should be reading his more popular works like Romeo and Juliet, and As You Like It. But then my book list kept expanding (and still does) to the point where I did not want to concentrate on one author at all times. There is another reason, but I’ll reveal it as I round off this review.

Two by Two – Nicholas Sparks Needs To Calm Down A Little

There is no particular reason I picked up this book, other than that the Kindle version was available for a dirt cheap price. But reading this book sort of put me in a position where I was almost ready to chuck my device at the wall in absolute fury. I hate the book, but deep down, I know that it’s not the book I hate, but a certain character.

The Cherry Tree – The Perfect Dose of Warm Nostalgia

The Cherry Tree is the story of a young boy called Rakesh who plants a seed and then watches it grow, amidst many obstacles, into a strong tree that gives shade and life. It is nothing out of the ordinary. But when Rakesh becomes ecstatic that the plant has taken roots, or when he becomes sad that animals have nipped off the leaves, you laugh and cry with him.

Steve Jobs – The Rudely Honest Genius Visionary

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson is a purely unbiased biography of who could possibly be the most influential visionary the world has ever seen. Yes, at the time, he seemed to have been overhyped. He was worshipped like a God. But after reading Isaacson’s well-researched account of Jobs’ life, I think that maybe he was a God in his own ways.

Scion of Ikshvaku – Amish’s Take On Righteous Prince Ram

Scion of Ikshvaku came out in 2015 and had been sitting on my bookshelf ever since. I don’t have any particular reason why I put off reading Scion of Ikshvaku. Maybe I wanted to be able to give it my everything, maybe I wanted to treasure it for far longer than seemed apparent and fair. I don’t really know how that worked. But I finally picked it up.

Melody’s Key by Dallas Coryell

The blurb to Melody’s Key has a pretty interesting ring to it. So when I got the chance to read and review the book, I went ahead immediately. The book starts off on quite a comic note, one that many people find themselves in.

Dear Sakhi – The Lost Journals Of The Ladies Of Hastinapur

The reason I picked up this book is that it is related to the Hastinapur series by Sharath Komarraju. When I finished The Rise of Hastinapur, I knew there was a long wait before the next book came out and I was mighty disappointed. But Sharath Komarraju offered me this: Dear Sakhi: The Lost JournalsContinue reading “Dear Sakhi – The Lost Journals Of The Ladies Of Hastinapur”

The Puppeteers of Palem – Confusion, Horror, And Satisfaction Rolled Into One!

Sharath Komarraju’s books give out a rustic, village feeling. Everything the characters do is filled with an Indianness that resonates with everyone. He, yet again, sets his story in a small village where as he says, “everyone knows everyone else.” The Puppeteers of Palem starts off on a tentatively eerie note, as if it is trying to gauge whether or not the reader is going to get scared.

Mrs Funnybones – The Perfect Blend of Humor, Thoughtfulness, and Perfect Advice!

Mrs Funnybones is a book that makes you feel happy and light in the end but still leaves you with a weird sense of zeal and inspiration that propels you forward.

Murder in Amaravati – Scintillatingly Thrilling and Captivating!

The reason I keep going back to read Sharath Komarraju’s books is his exceptional description skills. His words have a knack of transporting you into the scene almost immediately. His wonderful insights into the workings of the mind, especially a woman’s, leave me spellbound. At one place, he says, “She wondered if it was the woman inside her that made her worry so. Did she always have to have something to think about, something to fret and brood over?”