Author Interview: Suanne Laqueur

I read Suanne Laqueur’s A Charm of Finches in March this year and was blown away with how beautifully she portrayed emotions and reality. This book is the second in the Venery series, but I felt comfortable reading it because it could even pass off as a standalone book. I wrote a review of the book and posted it on my blog (which you can read here), and to Goodreads. And then I forgot all about it.

Book Review: Dear Ijeawele or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a trailblazer when it comes to feminism. She says she is not an expert on the subject, but with her simple, sensible ideas, she is absolutely one. She knows what is right and what isn’t. Those things that we take to be absolutely okay in everyday life, she shows why they really aren’t. She has strong reasons for this, those that you can’t refute, try as you might. I love how she puts forth her ideas, be it in TED Talks, or in her books.

Book Review: Brave Enough by Kati Gardner

The thing that attracted me to this book and excited me the most was its cover – so much that I didn’t even read the blurb before jumping in. Sometimes, doing this and going in directly could result in amazing results like loving the book. And it was with this very hope that I became 'Brave Enough' to jump in and read this book. Now that I have finished reading it, I can’t even find the words to explain my feelings.

Book Review: Ghachar Ghochar by Vivek Shanbhag

Ghachar Ghochar was originally written in Kannada by Vivek Shanbhag and translated into English by Srinath Perur. The reasons why I picked this book are pretty simple: the cover, the rave reviews it had wherever I laid eyes on it, and the fact that a translation was getting as much international acclaim as Ghachar Ghochar was.

Book Review: A Charm of Finches by Suanne Laqueur

A Charm of Finches is the second in the Venery series – a detail that escaped me until it was too late and I had committed to reviewing it. This book is a free copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. So I started with the hope that I could keep up, despite not reading the first in the series, and that I’d still like A Charm of Finches.

A Man Without a Country – Acquainting Myself With Vonnegut

The title of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five had always been more prominent than the author himself. The book is on so many lists that it becomes difficult to avoid, popping up in the unlikeliest of places. And because of this, his name slowly started the process of gaining a place in my list of must-read authors. But it is not this one that I decided I’d start my Vonnegut journey on. I picked A Man Without a Country instead.

Turtles All The Way Down – John Green’s Depiction of Heartbreaking Reality

The blurb of Turtles All The Way Down is interesting. Not because it indicates mental illness, not because it indicates a certain level of mystery-solving, not because it seems like a novel that strives to be much more than what it looks like. But because it combines all the qualities and becomes much more than what it looks like.