Book Review: Slices of Life by Richa Gupta

Richa Gupta’s Slices of Life is a collection of short stories that span different genres and explore various facets of the human personality and psyche in a manner that makes you think and speculate and introspect about where we as humans come from, and where we are going. There are stories in there that can be classified as futuristic fiction, there are those that are domestic fiction, those that are contemporary fiction, those that talk about women empowerment, about familial relationships, friendships, romances, and daily life, and a whole lot more that you will probably be surprised to find in there.

Book Rant: Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani

This book would probably have killed me by giving me high blood pressure. I was so pissed off with each page I turned that it took me all my strength and energy to not throw the book across the room. And I was reading it on the Kindle app on my laptop, so I know that that was a good decision.

Book Review: The Worst Daughter Ever by Aarti V Raman

I have never read a book by Aarti V Raman before. She’s been on my radar, but I’ve never gotten the chance to read her work before. But this time, I did pick up one of her books and now, I know that any time I want to read a well-written romance by an Indian author, I’m going to go and read one of her books. And that’s all thanks to The Worst Daughter Ever!

Book Review: Life in the Sunshine – Autobiography of an Unknown Cricketer by T. Sathish

When you say ‘cricket’ in India, there’s a sense of euphoria and loyalty that permeates the atmosphere, along with a brightening of the eyes. This sport affects so many people and shapes their lives into what they finally turn out that it simply becomes a part of them. They could go on and on for ages expounding knowledge about the sport, analyzing it, and playing it with a zeal that becomes so hard to find most times. And Life in the Sunshine: Autobiography of an Unknown Cricketer is the story of three such people: Sat, Sam, and Trib, called the Triple Sundae.

Commentary on Sita Returns by Charu Walikhanna – Part 2

Part 2 of my rant on the issues pointed out in the book, Sita Returns: Modern India Through Her Eyes by Charu Walikhanna.

Book Review: Circus Folk & Village Freaks by Aparna Upadhyaya Sanyal

The first thing you’ll notice about this book is its stunning cover. The second thing you’ll notice and one that will leave you in awe is that it is a stunning, sturdy hardcover. And open the book and flip through the pages and you’ll see the third and the fourth things that will intrigue you to no end. These are stories written in couplets! And there are illustrations!

Commentary on Sita Returns by Charu Walikhanna – Part 1

Part 1 of my rant on the issues pointed out in the book, Sita Returns: Modern India Through Her Eyes by Charu Walikhanna.

Book Review: Snakes in the Meadows by Ayaz Kohli

'Snakes in the Meadows' begins with a letter that I felt, for some insane reason, was accusing me of being ignorant and unwilling to take action. It was a personal jibe when I first read it. And I didn’t understand why such a letter was addressed to me. Here’s a couple of lines from the letter: “I can’t believe that you’re unaware of our misery, oblivious of our suffering. And if you indeed don’t know anything, well, you don’t deserve to.”

Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

The thing about being a bookworm, book-hoarder, and booklover in general is that beautiful covers pull us in like a moth to flame. And when the story within is as beautiful as the cover promises, a sense of vindication overcomes us – one that we just won’t stop flaunting and saying ‘I told you so!’ Yes, opinions may vary and some other people may get annoyed saying “What a waste of a beautiful cover” and all that. But when it works for you, you just want to hug it and stay that way. 'The Binding' by Bridget Collins is one such book.

Book Review: Atonement by Ian McEwan

The word ‘atonement’ usually means making amends for your actions that have done wrong to a person or people around you. And when a book with this name starts off with a teenager trying to direct a play that she can show off at a family gathering, you wonder why it is named thus. It is only some tens of pages into the book that you read on, becoming horrified with each page as the story progresses and clears the contextual meaning of the title for you.