King Lear – Strenuous To Read But Heartbreaking

The only book I’d read of William Shakespeare was Timon of Athens. As time passed, I thought, maybe I should be reading his more popular works like Romeo and Juliet, and As You Like It. But then my book list kept expanding (and still does) to the point where I did not want to concentrate on one author at all times. There is another reason, but I’ll reveal it as I round off this review.

The Cherry Tree – The Perfect Dose of Warm Nostalgia

The Cherry Tree is the story of a young boy called Rakesh who plants a seed and then watches it grow, amidst many obstacles, into a strong tree that gives shade and life. It is nothing out of the ordinary. But when Rakesh becomes ecstatic that the plant has taken roots, or when he becomes sad that animals have nipped off the leaves, you laugh and cry with him.

Steve Jobs – The Rudely Honest Genius Visionary

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson is a purely unbiased biography of who could possibly be the most influential visionary the world has ever seen. Yes, at the time, he seemed to have been overhyped. He was worshipped like a God. But after reading Isaacson’s well-researched account of Jobs’ life, I think that maybe he was a God in his own ways.

The Tumor – A View of Reality and A Glimmer of Hope

‘The Tumor’ is more like a medical paper than anything else. Grisham says that it is the most important book he has ever written. And without having read any of his books before this, I’ll say I agree. So says my gut. Health and cure are always most important. Always.