July 2019 Book Releases I’m Excited About!

Welcome to the July 2019 edition of Books Releasing This Month That I’m Excited About but Probably Won’t Read Anytime Soon. 😛

Turtles All The Way Down – John Green’s Depiction of Heartbreaking Reality

The blurb of Turtles All The Way Down is interesting. Not because it indicates mental illness, not because it indicates a certain level of mystery-solving, not because it seems like a novel that strives to be much more than what it looks like. But because it combines all the qualities and becomes much more than what it looks like.

Introduction Post Revamp – Hello, Hello Again!

There’s nothing better in the world than feeling pumped after reading a good book or watching a good movie. Okay, I agree. Not all books and not all movies are entertaining. But you get the general idea. It is the anticipation that is most exciting.

Bridget Jones’s Diary – What Was That About?

Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’s Diary is on a number of must-read lists. The novel, written as a diary, follows Bridget Jones (obviously), a woman in her thirties who is struggling with what looks like everything in her life. Her weight issues, her relationships, her insecurities – everything is laid bare in her diary. Every day is a new resolution to bring her life on track. But as human will has the collapse at any point in time, without prior notice, so does Bridget Jones fall back into her old habits.

‘Flawed’ and ‘Perfect’ – A Duology That Perfectly Describes Humanity

Our understanding of the world is a little twisted at most times. It takes a lot for us to understand that to err is human. Nobody is perfect. And our flaws are what make us what we are. They define our personality.

King Lear – Strenuous To Read But Heartbreaking

The only book I’d read of William Shakespeare was Timon of Athens. As time passed, I thought, maybe I should be reading his more popular works like Romeo and Juliet, and As You Like It. But then my book list kept expanding (and still does) to the point where I did not want to concentrate on one author at all times. There is another reason, but I’ll reveal it as I round off this review.

Murder in Amaravati – Scintillatingly Thrilling and Captivating!

The reason I keep going back to read Sharath Komarraju’s books is his exceptional description skills. His words have a knack of transporting you into the scene almost immediately. His wonderful insights into the workings of the mind, especially a woman’s, leave me spellbound. At one place, he says, “She wondered if it was the woman inside her that made her worry so. Did she always have to have something to think about, something to fret and brood over?”