Melody’s Key by Dallas Coryell

The blurb to Melody’s Key has a pretty interesting ring to it. So when I got the chance to read and review the book, I went ahead immediately. The book starts off on quite a comic note, one that many people find themselves in.

‘Us’ – Dark Humor That Brings You Back To Earth

It was on a grim, depressing day that I picked up ‘Us’ by David Nicholls. Walking around the bookstore in the mall that I usually go to when I need some me time, I spotted this book sitting against a number of Agatha Christies – a very unusual place to be, in my opinion. The very intriguing cover piqued my dull senses and I gave the blurb a once over.

False Ceilings – A Compelling Story of Dysfunctional Realities

Author Amit Sharma’s book, False Ceilings, I have to admit, is a pleasant surprise in terms of how strongly it makes you feel nostalgic and want to go back to reading history as soon as possible. The summary at the back of the book provides a certain level of intrigue that is added to by the muted impressiveness of the front cover.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: Childhood Through The Bylanes Of Adulthood

When Harry Potter and the Cursed Child was announced, I, like many of the Harry Potter fanatics out there, was beyond ecstatic. This joy was a little diminished when it came to light that Cursed Child would only be a play. “Great!” I thought miserably. “This way, I’ll never enter the post-Voldemort world of Harry Potter. I’ll never know how Harry fared as an adult. I’ll never experience magic again.”

Dear Sakhi – The Lost Journals Of The Ladies Of Hastinapur

The reason I picked up this book is that it is related to the Hastinapur series by Sharath Komarraju. When I finished The Rise of Hastinapur, I knew there was a long wait before the next book came out and I was mighty disappointed. But Sharath Komarraju offered me this: Dear Sakhi: The Lost Journals … Continue reading Dear Sakhi – The Lost Journals Of The Ladies Of Hastinapur

The Puppeteers of Palem – Confusion, Horror, And Satisfaction Rolled Into One!

Sharath Komarraju’s books give out a rustic, village feeling. Everything the characters do is filled with an Indianness that resonates with everyone. He, yet again, sets his story in a small village where as he says, “everyone knows everyone else.” The Puppeteers of Palem starts off on a tentatively eerie note, as if it is trying to gauge whether or not the reader is going to get scared.

Mrs Funnybones – The Perfect Blend of Humor, Thoughtfulness, and Perfect Advice!

Mrs Funnybones is a book that makes you feel happy and light in the end but still leaves you with a weird sense of zeal and inspiration that propels you forward.

Murder in Amaravati – Scintillatingly Thrilling and Captivating!

The reason I keep going back to read Sharath Komarraju’s books is his exceptional description skills. His words have a knack of transporting you into the scene almost immediately. His wonderful insights into the workings of the mind, especially a woman’s, leave me spellbound. At one place, he says, “She wondered if it was the woman inside her that made her worry so. Did she always have to have something to think about, something to fret and brood over?”

The Tumor – A View of Reality and A Glimmer of Hope

‘The Tumor’ is more like a medical paper than anything else. Grisham says that it is the most important book he has ever written. And without having read any of his books before this, I’ll say I agree. So says my gut. Health and cure are always most important. Always.

Donoor’s Curse – A Semi-Thrilling Adventure of Science and Superstition

Donoor’s Curse is a story woven around the village of Donoor; a village steeped in superstition. Or so it may seem. But when Devdutt Pathak loses his godfather, who has very wisely or unwisely left him clues, Dev heads out to the village to find out why his baba was unceremoniously snatched from him. What follows is a thrilling story of adventure and revelations and shocks, woven in with Dev’s spasms of alcoholic craving.